Visual art grants

Focus: Understand how to use Logic Pro thoroughly and to improve recording and mixing, as well as composition and songwriting skills using both audio and software instruments and samples.

At age 16, Nicc Johnson began his career as a DJ with the dream of eventually working in the international electronic music hub of Ibiza, Spain. With an unprecedented level of drive and determination, he would exceed that goal shortly to become the resident DJ at Ibiza’s most famous club, Pacha, for seven years, and move on to consult for restaurants, curating and creating music for playlists all around the world.

How about F? This one is easy too. The interval between F and C is also a perfect fifth. But this time we’re going down a fifth, not up. So to get down to F, we’re going to divide C’s frequency by 3/2, which gives us 2/3 Hz. We can then bring it up an octave by doubling its frequency, giving us an F at 4/3 Hz.

Grants for teachers

In summing up (ha!), phase is not just a potential problem in audio engineering. It’s actually one of the essential components of sound alteration. We’ve only touched on some of the most basic theory and techniques here. It will serve a budding engineer well to dive even deeper.

All of the notes above Fret 12 on any string are just repetitions of the same notes, an octave above (for example, Fret 14 on the 6th string is an F#, an octave above the same note on Fret 2 on the same string). Therefore, we can simply subtract 12 from the fret number and proceed repeating the same process we have discussed until now.

Instructed by composer and producer Martin D. Fowler (This American Life, Limetown, etc.), this course is an all-encompassing boot camp in one of the most widely used and most multi-functional DAWs out there: Logic Pro X. It’s used by pro-level producers, songwriters, engineers, and composers of all types to achieve the sound they’re searching for. Logic is also extremely affordable as far as DAWs go, making it perfect for the home-recording musician.

Lulu’s creation mirrors the themes of its plot. Berg started writing it after being emboldened by the success of his first opera, Wozzeck, in the 1920s. He made significant progress but abandoned the project following the death of Manon Gropius, a muse of Berg’s and essentially he and his wife’s adoptive daughter. By the time the violin concerto he dedicated to Gropius debuted, Berg himself had already died at age 50. Blood poisoning took his life on Christmas Eve in 1935, and Lulu was left only one-third orchestrated.

Today I want to look at his first movement from “Musica Ricercata,” a piece for solo piano which features a very unusual choice: The use of one single note for the vast majority of the composition. Listen below.

Construction grants

Labeling tracks and keeping a detailed record of what’s happening during a recording session is crucial for saving time. Don’t do this during the initial recording process, which should flow without periodic interruptions, but rather when you’re mixing the material later on. Take a small amount of time to label each track or input before and after you record each piece. And keep handwritten notes in a notebook (or at least on a separate screen other than the one used to record).

In this landmark case, Judge Kevin Thomas Duffy ruled that Warner Brothers had to stop all distribution of Biz Markie’s song and album, and that Markie owed O’Sullivan $250,000 in damages. Judge Duffy began his opinion with the biblical admonition, “Thou shalt not steal,” and referred the case to criminal court on the grounds of theft (Markie was not charged this time).

Beginning songwriters should be aware that the advances they receive are an advance against future royalties. The publisher won’t pay any additional royalties from your songs until the advance has been recouped. Songwriters who have or who are considering a music publishing deal should know that not all advance arrangements are created equal. Consult with an attorney or a qualified professional you trust to help you negotiate the best possible advance.

In 20th and 21st century music there is a lot of imagination and experimentation, and strong interest in spirituality in general. But there isn’t much of this kind of intimate interweaving of specific sounds with concrete theological symbols. Composers like James MacMillan are exploring this sort of theology-based musical practice, as one writer describes his work, “giving the symbols and signs of Christianity their own flesh-and-blood physicality.” Others like Arvo Pärt use related methods in a broader sense. And surely there are other creative musicians working in this vein today.

Ellisa Sun cuts out her heart and leaves it on the stage — which is why she never wears white. Currently on her first national tour, Ellisa is showing she has what it takes to make it on her own. Just a guitar, a 30-foot RV, and an insatiable desire to perform. Raised in Los Angeles and (until recently) based in the San Francisco Bay Area, her sound is honest, heartfelt, and textured, combining elements of jazz, soul, and pop.